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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
ALJAZAM 08/13/2014
Beban: For Edward Snowden, discovering that a top secret project called MonsterMind was in the works was the last straw. Once he learned about it, Snowden says in the new issue of “Wired” he decided it was time to go public and tell the world what he knew about the national security agency's surveillance programs. He says monster mind is designed to be an automatic program of tremendous power. Housed at the NSA's massive data center in the Utah desert. It would essentially be the ultimate cyber-cop, constantly on the look out for the beginnings of a foreign cyber-attack on United States computers capable of deciding on its own when and how to strike back. But attacks are often routed through computers in innocent countries. That's a problem, Snowden says. Security analysts agree.
Paul Beban
Correspondent, Al Jazeera America
ALJAZAM 08/13/2014
Walsh: The costs and risk come in all sorts of forms. it may be that we respond and attack the wrong person or we respond and attack the wrong country and that causes an international event. Beban: Then there are the constitutional concerns. For MonsterMind to spot malicious attacks it would have to constantly analyze all the traffic on the internet. Snowden tells wired that means violating the fourth amendment seizing private communications without a warrant without probable cause or even a suspicion of wrongdoing for everyone all the time.
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
ALJAZAM 08/13/2014
Beban: Finally, there's the simple question of whether it's a good idea to leave the decision to wage a form of war up to a machine. Walsh: I'm sure that we're going to get arguments here and probably good arguments from the intelligence community that says all this happens at lightning speeds and that unless you're able to retaliate instantly, your opportunity may pass. And that may be true. But then that has to be weighed against the public policy costs and benefits and again we see no discussion of that. Beban: The NSA wouldn't comment on the article. A spokesperson for the NSA did say that Snowden should talk to the Department of Justice, about the charges against him. Now Snowden actually told “Wired” that he is willing to “volunteer for prison. That he cares more about the country than what happens to him.” And he also said, John, that more revelations about the NSA are coming.
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